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Common Burn Treatment

Biobrane dressing


Biobrane is a dressing that adheres to the burn wound to help with healing for up to two weeks. The burn team will place Biobrane using tape and outer dressings, and one day after placement, they will check to make sure it has adhered to the wound. If it has, the outer dressings are no longer required. As the burn heals, the edges of the Biobrane will lift off of the new skin.


Instructions

  • You may trim the edges of the Biobrane as healing continues and the dressing lifts off of the new skin.

  • Do not put any ointment or creams on top of the dressing because this can cause the Biobrane to fall off.

  • 48 hours after the Biobrane is applied, your child may shower or take a bath. After the bath, gently pat the dressing dry.


Signs of infection

  • Redness around the burn with or without a rash

  • Blue/green drainage

  • Fever of more than 101°F (38.3°C)

Burn dressing


Our team uses a special gel dressing that will dry out over time and stick to the burn. It can be left in place for 21 days. Keep the dressing dry at all times and change the outer dressings daily or as needed to keep dry. When outer dressings are off, look at the gel dressing to make sure it is in place and covering the burn.


Dressing removal


The dressing will detach itself from the burn as it heals.  As this happens, you can cut away the parts of the dressing that have come loose.  Lifting or pulling off the dressing before the burn is healed could harm the burn.  Do not remove the dried dressing from non-healed areas without speaking to the burn unit first. 


When to call the burn unit

  • Unusual pain or odor from the burn

  • The dressing won’t stay in place or doesn’t attach to the burn within 3 days

  • The dressing is preventing movement of a joint

Duoderm

 

Duoderm is a waterproof, brown dressing that can stay on a wound for up to seven days. 


Instructions

  • Keep the burned area clean and dry.

  • Change the outer wraps every day with the supplies given to you. These dressings help keep the Duoderm clean, dry and in place. 

  • Do NOT remove the brown dressing. This will stay on for seven days or until your follow-up appointment. 

  • Your child may take a quick bath or shower then pat the Duoderm dry and replace the outer dressings.

  • If the Duoderm falls off, wash the burn area with soap and water then pat dry. Apply a new piece of Duoderm and wrap with the supplies given to you.


Tips

  • Drainage from the burn will collect underneath the dressing. This is normal. If the drainage begins to leak out the side of the dressing, then the dressing will need to be changed.

  • The drainage and the dressing will sometimes smell bad after the dressing has been on for a few days. This is normal. 


Signs of infection

  • Redness around the burn with or without a rash

  • Blue/green drainage

  • Fever of more than 101°F (38.3°C)

Dressing changes using collagenase and double antibiotic ointment


Collagenase is an ointment used to help remove eschar from a burn wound. Collagenase does not prevent infection, so double antibiotic ointment is used with it. You may use any double antibiotic ointment such as Polysporin. 


Instructions

  • Change the dressing once daily at bath or shower time.

  • If needed, give a dose of pain medication prior to the dressing change and wait 30 minutes. 

  • Remove the dressing then give your child a bath or shower. Soak the burn for 10-15 minutes. Use soap and water on a soft wash cloth to gently clean the burn area.

  • Pat the burn dry.

  • If the burn covers a joint (knee, elbow, finger) or is on the palm of the hand, do stretches while the dressing is off. 

  • Apply the Collagenase ointment to the burn then cover with the moist gauze given to you (Adaptic or Xeroform). Apply the double antibiotic ointment on top of the moist gauze. Wrap with the supplies given to you.


Tips 

 

  • Yellow drainage from the burn is normal and is not a sign of infection.

  • Bleeding sometimes occurs during the dressing change. Bleeding is a good thing because it is a sign of healthy tissue. Hold pressure with gauze or clean wash cloth to stop the bleeding if necessary.


Signs of infection

 

  • Redness around the burn with or without a rash

  • Blue/green drainage

  • Fever of more than 101°F (38.3°C)

Double antibiotic ointment 


You may use any double antibiotic ointment. The ointment helps protect against infection and keeps the burn moist.


Instructions

 

  • Change the dressing once daily at bath or shower time.

  • If needed, give a dose of pain medication prior to the dressing change and wait 30 minutes. 

  • Remove the dressing before giving your child a bath or shower. Soak the burn for 10-15 minutes. Use soap and water on a soft wash cloth to gently clean the burn area.

  • Pat the burn dry.

  • If the burn covers a joint (knee, elbow, finger) or is on the palm of the hand, do stretches while the dressing is off. 

  • Apply the antibiotic ointment to the burn then cover with a non-stick gauze and wrap with the supplies given
    to you.
     

Tips 

 

  • Yellow drainage from the burn is normal and is not a sign of infection.

  • Bleeding sometimes occurs during the dressing change. Bleeding is a good thing because it is a sign of healthy tissue. Hold pressure with gauze or clean wash cloth to stop the bleeding if necessary.


Signs of infection

 

  • Redness around the burn with or without a rash

  • Blue/green drainage

  • Fever of more than 101°F (38.3°C)

Silver Sulfadiazine (SSD)


Silver Sulfadiazine (SSD) is a thick, white cream used on burns to prevent infection and help with healing. 


Instructions

 

  • Change the dressing once daily at bath or shower time.

  • If needed, give a dose of pain medication prior to the dressing change and wait 30 minutes. 

  • Remove the dressing, then give your child a bath or shower. Soak the burn for 10-15 minutes. Use soap and water on a soft wash cloth to gently clean the burn area.

  • Pat the burn dry.

  • If the burn covers a joint (knee, elbow, finger) or is on the palm of the hand, do stretches while the dressing is off. 

  • Apply the SSD, then wrap with the dressings given to you.

Tips

 

  • Yellow drainage from the burn is normal and is not a sign of infection.

  • Bleeding sometimes occurs during the dressing change. Bleeding is a good thing because it is a sign of healthy tissue. Hold pressure with gauze or clean wash cloth to stop the bleeding if necessary.


Signs of infection

 

  • Redness around the burn with or without a rash

  • Blue/green drainage

  • Fever of more than 101°F (38.3°C)

Mepilex Ag


Mepilex Ag is a silver-impregnated dressing that is left on for up to seven days. It is not waterproof and cannot get wet. Mepilex needs to be secured with outer dressings to help keep it in place. 


Instructions

 

  • Once Mepilex Ag is placed on the burn, leave it there until your follow-up appointment.

  • You may change the outer dressings as needed to keep the area clean and dry. 

  • Sponge bath only until the Mepilex Ag is taken off at your follow–up appointment.

  • If the Mepilex Ag gets wet or falls off, please do the following:

    • Wash the burn area with soap and water.

    • Pat dry.

    • Cut the Mepilex Ag to the size you need then apply it to the burn.

    • Secure with tape or the supplies given to you.

  • You might notice drainage on the dressing. This is normal. If the drainage is leaking out the side of the dressing, the Mepilex Ag should be changed following the above instructions.


Tips

 

  • The dressing might smell bad. This is normal. 

  • If your child develops a fever or you notice any redness with or without rash around the burn, please contact the Burn Unit for instructions.


Signs of infection

 

  • Redness around the burn with or without a rash

  • Blue/green drainage

  • Fever of more than 101°F (38.3°C)