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COVID-19 vaccine: 6 facts you need to know

There is a lot of information circulating about COVID-19 vaccines and it is important for people to be educated. But with so much information available there also comes misinformation. Which is why we turned to our medical experts to set the record straight. Below are six facts you need to know about the COVID-19 vaccines.   

Fact No. 1

The COVID-19 vaccines cannot give you COVID-19.

The COVID-19 vaccines do not contain any live part of the virus and cannot cause an infection. They cannot cause a positive COVID-19 test.

Fact No. 2

The development of the COVID-19 vaccines did not skip any steps in determining their safety.

The COVID-19 vaccines have been evaluated in tens of thousands of people using the same steps as other vaccines to ensure they are safe. Scientists were able to test the vaccines quickly and safely by working together and using resources from academics, industry, and the government, which has never happened before.

Fact No. 3

The COVID-19 vaccines will not change your DNA or live inside you forever.

The current COVID-19 vaccines use messenger RNA (mRNA), which does not go into your DNA. Your body turns the mRNA into a protein to make an immune response (antibodies). Once your body makes antibodies, the mRNA and protein break down.

Fact No. 4

The COVID-19 vaccines do not cause miscarriage or infertility.

The COVID-19 vaccines have not been linked to miscarriages or infertility. The CDC and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology do not recommend withholding COVID-19 vaccine in pregnant women who are otherwise eligible to receive vaccine.

Fact No. 5

The COVID-19 vaccines can be given to people who already had COVID-19.

People with a history of COVID-19 were included in the COVID-19 vaccine trials. The vaccine is safe and effective in people with a history of COVID-19.

Fact No. 6

We know exactly what is in the COVID-19 vaccines.

The ingredients of the currently used COVID-19 vaccines are publicly available, can be found on the vaccine Fact Sheet, and are provided at the time of administration.

Read more about COVID-19 vaccine frequently asked questions here. 

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Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Director, Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine; Education Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Kansas School of Medicine

Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Clinical Pharmacology

Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship and Drug Safety Service; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine; Research Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Kansas School of Medicine